Popping the hood

Acting as the Mechanic in an Architectural Design firm requires openness and an understanding of the design goals and needs of your team.

Think of when you take a car to an auto mechanic:  it’s rare to hear that you are driving the vehicle incorrectly. Instead, the mechanic will listen to your description of the problem before popping the hood or taking a test drive to gather information. The mechanic needs to put aside ideas of proper use to focus on what their team needs to make the project move ahead.

Popping the Hood

The best BIM managers work as a visible part of the office team. To be visible is to be open-minded and continually have your ears open. As I stated in my post Thinking outside the box you need to get the team comfortable. Remember continually checking on your team and having the regular chats gives you more information than waiting for them to come to you.

I use the following list to embed myself into project discussions and ideas. I make sure all questions are phrased as such, and make sure my tone is not accusatory or brisk:

  • Walk the office looking at computer screens and asking what they are working on.
  • Ask team members  how they got the information they are using.
  • Review the model prior to people starting their work day and make notes on what I see.
  • Keep my ears open to conversations happening around me and interjecting if I can add any useful information.
  • Keep a positive attitude and inquisitive nature; you might learn a new process.

The other key to getting involved is to train the BIM tools efficiently: train to people’s needs and abilities. Without an understanding of the baseline skills of your team you may inadvertently allow some to struggle without understanding while others become frustrated with what to them feels remedial.  Keys to successful BIM Tools training:

  • Don’t teach them the same way you teach the person next to them, everybody has different learning styles.
  • Only use 1-4 hour training modules; don’t make them sit all day
  • Record the training so they can review later.
  • Create handouts of your process.
  • Review company projects to see the gaps and train

Make sure your team knows there is a role for BIM in every project, even when it is not in the contract. As BIM manager there is nothing more satisfying than to talk with a team and realize you can provide assistance with a new tool to facilitate a proposal to the client.  There is always something you can provide to help create amazing presentations for the client.

This is the most important role of the BIM manager to teach your team. Teaching them about these tools specific to their needs will improve all the work your office produces, while creating a true collaboration between the mechanic and designer.

BIMFreak in the World – Sharing is caring

It’s been a pretty eventful year so far for the BIMFreak:

  • I was the people profile in AEC bytes Q4 2016 publication
  • In 2015 Ideate Inc. invited me down to present in San Francisco, Sacramento and Oakland at the local Revit User Groups. Due to the amount of requests for me to come back from the users they have asked me to return the week before AU; November 8th and 9th to present the topic that formed from my blog post The Mechanic and the Designer. I will focus on the disruption in the Design workflow – post to follow.
  • I am collaborating on a BIM curriculum with the Department Head of the CAD and BIM Technology Department at Vancouver Community College in the fall semester. CAD and BIM Technologies
  • I am working with Scott Chatterton (BIM Jedi) for the VRCA to create a BIM 101 class that I will be teaching in the fall to help contractors in the Vancouver area understand and use BIM tools on projects. The goal of this course is to encourage an understanding of BIM, it’s technology and how it can enhance projects.
  • I will be presenting at Autodesk University November 14-16, check back for the schedule when it comes out, hope to see you in the audience.
  • I have begun work on a new book that will help you in becoming a BIM Manager, with a focus on:
    • Teaching BIM to an office
    • Strategies to understand and respond to design needs
    • Adjusting working strategies to suit different processes, personalities and project needs.

My new book is a continuation from my previous exploration on Becoming a BIM Advocate, the next step towards advancing your office in BIM.

ASK

I have also taken a step in a new direction, learning a new language and a greater understanding of how to implement BIM in a Designers world. It has always amazed me that I started this journey supporting in Architecture firms back in 1995. Of course the digital landscape changed very slowly from 1995 to 2008 simply using 2D software, once we took that hard turn towards the 3D world we have had an explosion. Looking back it is amazingly the same problem yet we all look at in a different way, the fact that Architectural firms now regularly employ Technology staff alongside the design staff proves the importance the digital tools have become.

Thinking outside the box

As a BIM advocate I have found myself trying to pull others into my linear workflow instead of working with their design workflow. In my last post  “the Mechanic and the Designer“, I talked about my breakthrough on how I can support the less direct workflow used by designers. My new struggle is; how can I do that? I’m a geek that loves BIM process and the idea of Open BIM (yep, it’s what I dream about), it’s hard for me to understand and anticipate the needs of designers.

So how do I support the non-linear workflow of designers?

I’ve been working on the basics of this for a while: this kind of support always starts with trust. I need the designers I work with to feel comfortable chatting with me about what they need and what will help them move forward with design. It’s hard to overstate the importance of this — designers need the space and time to work through a project and find the best approach, and often aren’t aware of the Revit support that’s available. Regular chats about the direction of the project and design options gives me information about what tools I can provide, and providing designers with simple tasks using BIM tools can encourage team members to be more adventurous in their BIM strategies.

Once I understood designers don’t use the BIM standard workflow and I decided to try to support a design-based non-linear workflow, I realized the only way to promote and encourage BIM use is to help designers find new (and BIM-based) solutions to their design problems. My opportunity to test this came when one of my teams needed to present a large multi-phase, multiyear project to a group of investors. The challenge? They needed to efficiently show phasing and construction for the site. When I learned of this need, I suggested using a 4D timeliner to show each phase as it is built. The team had never considered coming to me for help with this because they didn’t know this type of presentation tool was possible.

I took this opportunity to show them the power and interoperability of BIM tools by providing them a timeline video building massing for each phase of the design. This lead to questions of “how can we do that on more projects?”, and my favourite, “you mean I can get all the areas in real time using this massing and develop something to present?” Suddenly I was working with a team that was interested and excited about using BIM for presentation, and who wanted to learn more about how BIM could be collaborative and assist with the design of their project.

I broke down the steps for the designers and showed them that Revit massing is not very different from Sketchup, once you know how to put the different parts together. The benefit to using Revit is that it is designed for easy data extraction: there is no need to export to CAD and draw a polyline to figure out area.

I provided a simple massing process, and I didn’t try to convince them not to work in Sketchup. Instead, I let the designers start in a software with procedures where they were comfortable, and I asked them to let me move the work into Revit when they were ready to start calculations. Instead of asking them to start the Revit model from scratch, I took the Sketchup model into Revit and massed up the buildings.  I think because I don’t know Sketchup and I’m skilled at Revit it took me very little time. Once I had their model in place they used it to generate area numbers, and found they were comfortable enough in the model to edit the massing to review the impact of different floor plates on their maximum area calculations.

Now that team rarely opens Sketchup and they have used Revit to develop their design and take the model onto Design Development documents.

Funny how having passion to teach and drive BIM in the industry creates opportunities to lead designers into BIM without even planning it.

The Mechanic and the Designer

I have always struggled trying to understand why BIM is so difficult to implement. It makes sense to me –why doesn’t everyone else see that?

In a recent meeting with a Design Partner I finally had my big ah-ha moment. That moment came with the realization of why BIM never quite seems to work the way it should: the basic principle of BIM throughout the project workflow misses the needs of the Designer. There always seems to be a breakdown between the Designers toolbox and the documentation software. I’ve never understood why the Designers can’t use the software provided as intended, but it turns out the flaw is in my understanding of the Designer’s thought process.

This is where I have had a difficult time understanding why the word BIM makes some roll their eyes. BIM is used to capture information within a modeling environment using tools to create documentation. It’s being used by a designer who wants to be able to iterate, work out and mess with design throughout the process of the project. These two strategies are not fundamentally opposed, but my discussion with the Design Partner made it clear that the designer needs to have a tool kit that includes an array of different options. To unlock the potential of BIM, Designers need to be able to collect and test ideas to learn about how the information available to them can be translated into an amazing project.

This idea has set me on the path to re-educating myself in how BIM and design can work together. I think the key to successful BIM implementation is finding a way to help designers explore different ways available data can been used to generate form. My goal has always been to simplify information capture in the BIM model so the designer can focus on the essence of the project, so the question becomes how do we give the designers the toolkit the need and get to our BIM goals?

What we need is a two-way connection between our documenting software (which is usually Revit) to our design pipeline. This can include paper sketches or work in SketchUp, Rhino, 3D Max, and whatever exciting and new visualization tools that make our product look amazing and beautiful  — something historically been lacking in Revit). BIM software is designed to incorporate a tremendous amount of information, and it can be difficult to use with the limited amount of information that is available at the early stages of design. The work of design needs to be fuzzy and incomplete so the design itself can be reviewed while it is incomplete.

These soft edges to the design allows us to work within constraints with the information provided.  Providing data from within a model that we’ve already begun allows the designer to maintain design intent while reviewing the results of visual or functional iterations of the product. A live link in our documentation can give our designers a workflow that allows them to follow the standard design practice of a general idea becoming more and more specific. This reviewed and tested idea can then be placed into the documentation process.  This is winning at implementation.

The whole process was described to me as follows: the project is like a car.  I’m the mechanic. My job is to make sure that the engine continues to run and the design can still maintain visual aesthetics. Seeing this image drawn by the design partner (who is in essence an artist) completely changed my perspective on the project.  Illustrating the need in BIM management is that simple: we need to create a workflow that feeds the design intent into the documentation process throughout the lifecycle of the project.  Does that not blow your mind?

To further emphasize the communication barrier between designers and BIM managers, I explained to the design partner that I can see this as a cake.  This cake is built with layers:  my work is the layers underneath the icing.  The software and tools support the process. Although this metaphor worked for me, it wasn’t a fit for the design partner. For him the design is a car and I’m a mechanic.  His argument was with a cake the icing can be removed. It may not be the most delicious cake, but it’s still edible and therefore serves the basic function of a cake. You can’t have a car without an engine, and that’s an important distinction.

BIM managers need to learn to use language and metaphors that speak to designers, otherwise we will continue to have difficulties convincing teams to work with us on projects. My challenge is to mediate between the process-driven linear development that makes sense to me, and the less direct creative method of designers: we need to find a way to bring them together so that each can better communicate their issues and concerns.

Let’s rock the vote this year for AU proposals!

Autodesk University has opened up voting for proposals at AU this year: voting ends June 16th.  It’s time to take control of our choices! This year I’ve been thinking about BIM and tools we need to help it succeed. Please take a minute to voice your opinion of class descriptions to Autodesk so we can make AU better than ever with our choices.

Login to Proposal Voting AU Las Vegas to vote for classes you want to take. While you are there, be sure to check out my 2 submissions:

  1. BIM workflow: Developing strategies that spark great design in today’s market: How can designers use BIM tools to develop design when the owner wants the project delivered faster and cheaper? I will review ways architecture offices can design and implement a workflow that encourages creativity at the early phases of design while streamlining the documentation phase.

 

  1. When BIM isn’t in the contract: collaborating with reluctant consultants: How can architecture firms encourage consultants to get the best use out of BIM software? I will discuss strategies that have helped me to successfully collaborate with a consultant that uses Revit as a 2D drafting tool.

Questioning the Consultants

Question: why are consultants fighting the use of a BIM Process that can save them time and coordination headaches?

 

I frequently work with my colleagues to coordinate consultants, and it’s part of my job to make sure that our consultants know what we expect from them. Although our office works exclusively in Revit and requires our consultants to do so as well, I find that Revit gets used as a drafting tool instead of a BIM Tool. Consultants complain that using Revit to capture information such as slab slopes, ramps, stairs and wood framing is ‘not part of the fee’. They may be willing to model the major elements but they do not want to provide a model for coordination with the architect or to the client.

The struggle is real: working with smaller consultant firms is a big problem when trying to facilitate interoffice BIM goals. If BIM is not required by the client most smaller firms would prefer to charge more for using a BIM workflow. I think that the use of Revit implies a start to the BIM workflow. After all, if you use the software as intended to incorporate information 3D coordination will occur.  There is an amazing advantage to all parties involved in the project.

Struggle

My response is always the same. Although our clients may not have explicit BIM goals, my office has an expectation that all consultants will collaborate on the project. We strive to deliver the best project possible to the client, and we need efficient collaboration to make this happen. Each project utilizing the BIM Tool Revit gets some sort of BIM Execution Plan (BIMeX) and I expect consultants on our projects to build models to a level that is documented in the BIMex and discussed at the project Kick-off meeting with all parties involved.

I am always confused by the consultant approach of using Revit as a 2D drafting tool. Revit is a BIM tool and it draws in 3D and is not a 2D drafting tool. Accurate modelling that all team members can use for coordination is the entire point of the software! Is this where BIM sputters? Is this the first edition of the software? Absolutely not: this is 2017 and we have been using this process for several years.

Understanding client requirements can allow the Architect to dictate the need for BIM Goals and create an in-house BIM Execution Plan. These requirements should be written into the consultant agreement and all consultants should agree to abide by the BIMeX. These meetings are meant to outline the use of software during the project timeline, the Level of Development within the model, what is modeled, how models are exchanged and who owns what elements in the 3D environment.

Once the BIMeX is created and agreed upon by the Architectural team it’s time to have a Project Kick-off meeting to go over the BIMeX and requirements of the projects modeling needs. It’s always best to sit down in person to discuss these requirements to make sure there is no confusion and everyone can agree upon the BIM Goals and deliverable. This documentation is used throughout the lifecycle of the project for a record of modeling responsibilities and requirements that all parties agreed on.

As Henry Ford said:   “If everyone is moving forward together, then success takes care of itself.”

A Year Later…

one-year

It has been a year and the journey has been rough at times, but I am optimistic the future is bright.

A person who never made a mistake never tried anything new – Albert Einstein

A year ago I wrote about a New adventure I was starting at ZGF Cotter Architects: http://wp.me/p4aYOX-2j. A lot has happened in that year; we dropped the Cotter and are now fully established as ZGF, the Canadian branch of the Number One Architectural firm in America.

As a design firm, ZGF believes in utilizing technology research to help better the design. As the year has progressed I’ve discovered what that phrase actually means to the firm. I’ve heard people say “don’t get in the designer’s way.” I didn’t really understand this phrase from my perspective of process and support. I am not an architect and I do not design amazing buildings or come up with incredible solutions for a client’s building; I do not want to. My job is to support those that do.

What I love is to work with process. I believe that technology can be leveraged to give designers more time to focus on what *they* really want to do and do well. I believe creating standards for content and materials enables users to focus on design and forget about the technology behind the output. When I hear the phrase “stay out of the way”, I now understand it’s about streamlining the process so you can keep the technology out of the way.

This past year has been a period of learning and growth to discover the best ways to help my designer-colleagues use BIM technology. To date my job as Design Technology Manager has followed these three phases:

Phase One: Understand what currently is used to help the designer tell a story for the project.

  • Are there specific types of software that are used?
  • What is the workflow during the design process?
  • How does that differ from project to project?
  • When is the design process at a point for documentation?
  • Does design ever stop?

Phase two:

  • Learn how to link software together so the design intent and work remains intact.
  • Work with colleagues to identify where information management can be automated and streamline workflow.
  • Review different project types to make sure that universally applied processes still apply.
  • Create templates to assist team with process documentation
  • Ensure that technology process allows for updates and changes along the project timeline.

Phase three: Setup a BIM Implementation plan for the Vancouver office and focus on making it succeed.